3 tylenol pm at once

Type 2 diabetes can be a 'devastating diagnosis' says expert

We use your sign-up to provide content in ways you’ve consented to and to improve our understanding of you. This may include adverts from us and 3rd parties based on our understanding. You can unsubscribe at any time. More info

Type 2 diabetes can be a 'devastating diagnosis' says expert

Diabetes type 2 is a common condition that affects about five million people in the UK. While the number of diabetes patients is growing, you could still lower your risk of developing the condition by following one of the best diets proven to help lower blood sugars says new study.

Low-calorie meal replacement diets are the most effective methods of weight loss and remission in adults with type 2 diabetes.

Comparing numerous research studies, it was concluded that reducing calories, rather than reducing certain food groups (e.g. carbs) was the most effective for weight loss.

Dr Lucy Chambers, head of research communications at Diabetes UK, said: “This review, adalat xl 30 mg tablet which combines findings from many studies, answers important questions about which diets are most effective for weight loss and remission in people with type 2 diabetes.

“Diets that focus on reducing calories, such as low-calorie meal replacement diets, rather than reducing intake of certain nutrients or foods groups, such as carbohydrates, were found to give people with type 2 diabetes the best chance of losing weight and going into remission.  

“It’s important to remember that there’s no one-size-fits-all ‘diet for diabetes’.

“Low-calorie diets can be challenging, and if you have type 2 diabetes and want to lose weight, getting support from a healthcare professional can help you find an approach that is safe and works for you.”

The study which was published in Diabetologia (the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) found that low energy diets with formula meal replacements are the most effective methods of weight management and remission in adults with type 2 diabetes (T2D), while the macronutrient content is not important to outcomes.

The research was conducted by Professor Mike Lean, Dr Chaitong Churuangsuk and colleagues at the Universities of Glasgow, and others from Cambridge and Otago Universities.

The group analysed published meta-analyses of which type of diet is best for achieving and then maintaining weight loss in adults with T2D.

While T2D is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors, it is rising levels of obesity which has driven the current global epidemic of diabetes.

The authors noted: “Without strategic commitment internationally on effective prevention strategies, type 2 diabetes will affect an estimated 629 million people worldwide by 2045.”

What did the study find?

Weight loss of 15kg or more was achieved by 24 percent of the intervention group compared to none of the usual care group. Average weight loss was 10kg in the intervention group versus 1kg in the usual care group.

Diabetes remission occurred in 46 percent of the intervention group compared to four percent of the usual care group.

Remission was 20 times more likely with the intervention

Better adherence to the regime increased the amount of weight loss and the chance of diabetes remission.

Diabetes medication did not need to be reintroduced for 74 percent of the intervention group. This was compared to 18 percent of the usual care group who were able to stop them.

Source: Read Full Article