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Bill Turnbull discusses benefits of medicinal cannabis

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Rajyagor said “education is central” to how medicinal cannabis is seen and how change is brought about.

The question is, the education of who?

Where campaigners for medicinal cannabis expansion agree is that in this case it is GPs as well as the public who need educating.

The reason for this is so GPs can feel confident in prescribing medicinal cannabis products.

GPs, just like other professionals, tetracycline and chelation owe a duty of care to their patients.

As a result, understandably they don’t want to prescribe something they don’t understand or unfamiliar with.

Rajyagor said: “ It’s about educating them on what to prescribe and how to prescribe, how they should be looking at it and how they should be managing that patient journey.”

The reason for this is because cannabis, adds Rajyagor, is “not like other medications where it’s a single chemical solution or a single isolate solution. It’s a full spectrum and it needs to be managed accordingly”.

While a lack of education among GPs is a problem, Rajyagor has a solution being developed at Sana.

The solution in question “is a platform for doctors free to use which enables them to be educated about the governance process around cannabis from a regulatory perspective”.

“It takes them through an entire journey to help them become comfortable with prescribing.”

The aim is that with more GPs prescribing medicinal cannabis this in turn will help change the optics of medicinal cannabis.

Speaking of awareness among the general public, fellow entrepreneur Pierre Van Weperen said: “A lot of people are not aware that you can get cannabis on prescription and a lot of people who are now in the NHS and seeing private doctors are not aware you can get cannabis on prescription.”

With a change in the optics and the attachment of medicinal cannabis to certain conditions the hope is people will move from associating cannabis with recreational to the medicinal.

So far medicinal cannabis has been attached with benefiting patients with a range of conditions such as:
• Anxiety
• Chronic pain
• Long Covid
• Brain tumours
• Epilepsy
• Crohn’s disease
• Prostate cancer
• Bowel cancer.

However, there are some caveats to medicinal cannabis’s potential benefits.

A lot of the positive results have come from early-stage trials or laboratory tests.

There is still a long tough road ahead for greater medicinal cannabis expansion on the NHS.

Nevertheless, with more studies and evidence will come greater credibility and persuasiveness among the medicinal establishment and the public.

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